The Front

 

The shoulders are strong, sloping, muscular and well angulated to the upper arm and should not be too closely set at the point of the withers. The forelegs have strong, round bone, extending to the feet and should show flexibility with a slight angle to the forearm when viewed from the side. Although the shoulders are muscular and the bone is strong, loaded shoulders and heavy fronts will hamper correct movement and limit working ability.

The requirement is for a hard working dog that needs to cover long distances and work many hours. The upper arm should join the shoulder blade as near to 90 degrees as possible.

The forelegs when viewed from all angles should be muscular, clean and strong boned. When viewed from the side there should be a slight angle of pastern which is necessary to absorb shock from the forequarters. Too much angle will result in loose weak wrists and too straight in pastern will cause jarring which puts a strain on the entire front assembly. Under hard work these poor fronts will break down. There is a great tendency to see a large number of short upper arms, which does not allow for the correct extension required. From the wither to the point of elbow should be equal to point of elbow to the ground. This is a problem area where the chest is either too shallow or extends past the point of elbow or the foreleg from the elbow to ground is too short. All these hinder correct, free, supple movement.

Kaleski writes. “The shoulders are strong and well sloped, so that the dog gallops easily and drops with ease when biting. Chest is deep because a shallow-chested dog has no heartroom and is easily thrown off balance. If too deep, or “Bulldoggy” he cannot travel at any speed but it must not be out of proportion to the body”.

The forelegs when viewed from all angles should be muscular, clean and strong boned. When viewed from the side there should be a slight angle of pastern which is necessary to absorb shock from the forequarters. Too much angle will result in loose weak wrists and too straight in pastern will cause jarring which puts a strain on the entire front assembly. Under hard work these poor fronts will break down. There is a great tendency to see a large number of short upper arms, which does not allow for the correct extension required. From the wither to the point of elbow should be equal to point of elbow to the ground. This is a problem area where the chest is either too shallow or extends past the point of elbow or the foreleg from the elbow to ground is too short. All these hinder correct, free, supple movement.

Kaleski writes. “The shoulders are strong and well sloped, so that the dog gallops easily and drops with ease when biting. Chest is deep because a shallow-chested dog has no heartroom and is easily thrown off balance. If too deep, or “Bulldoggy” he cannot travel at any speed but it must not be out of proportion to the body”.